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BOB SHANE
of the KINGSTON TRIO

In Bob and Louise Shane's attractive Marin County (California) home, East meets West. Bob was raised in Hawaii, and his tastes are reflected in Oriental and Polynesian furnishings indigenous to the Islands. And Louise, a product of the culture of Atlanta, Georgia, has succeeded in making a tasteful blend of Bob's heritage with her own flair for traditional decor. Perhaps the meeting is a natural one -- for they live exactly 2500 miles from Atlanta and 2500 miles from the Beach at Waikiki.

Bob was born in Hilo, Hawaii. His father, a successful wholesale distributor of toys and sporting goods in the Hawaiian Islands, made plans for his son to take over the business when he retired. So, although Bob sang in the Glee Club, and appeared in several school plays, variety shows and operettas during his high school days, entertainment was only a leisure-time activity. But he could often be found on the beaches of Hawaii with his ukelele, learning songs of the Polynesian Islands from yachtsmen and travelers.

During those days, Bob became acquainted with a serviceman from the mainland stationed in Hawaii who shared his hobby of singing to their own accompaniment. (Bob plays a 6-string guitar and a 4-string banjo). They would thus perform at parties here and there - some of which they crashed.

One night they met James Cagney, who was so impressed by the boys' talent he told them, "You ought to be in pictures, and if you get to Hollywood, look me up." Shane never availed himself of Cagney's generous -- and sincere -- offer, but the "tough-guy" actor did give a boost up the ladder to the other fellow, now TV star Roger Smith.

After graduation from Honolulu's Punahou School in 1952, Bob came to the mainland to study at the Menlo Park School of Business Administration in Menlo Park, California. He graduated in 1956 and returned to Hawaii to learn the ropes of the retail business at Sears-Roebuck.

During his college days, Bob had entertained in campus shows, so it was natural that he expanded his interests in this direction in Hawaii. He began working in his off hours at Honolulu night spots, doing impersonations, meanwhile trying to find his own voice and style.

Bob soon found himself so much in demand as a performer that he was devoting more time to entertaining than to retailing. It was then that he decided to return to California to join Nick and form the group that was to become the Kingston Trio.

During a Kingston engagement at Honolulu's Royal Hawaiian Hotel, Bob met vacationing Louise Brandon of Atlanta. They were engaged on Christmas Day, 1958, and married the following March 15 in a wedding that was one of the major social events of the. year in Washington, D.C.

Bob loves the water and power-boating. And he also spends a good deal of his leisure time swimming. His extensive record collection runs heavily to his favorites: Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra, and the Mariachi music of Mexico. Bob also has a collection of rare and antique firearms.

Nick Reynolds introduced Bob to skeet shooting and he took so readily to the sport that within a year he was walking away from the California State Championship Shoot with three trophies, including a Class E High Over-All Championship cup.

In contrast to Bob's prowess with a shotgun, Louise is proficient with pistols. She has an impressive collection of trophies attesting to the fact that she is a crack shot with sidearms.

Bob has another interest in common with Nick: sports car driving, Bob owns a bright red A.C. Bristol Sports racing model.

The Shanes live in a beautiful setting in Tiburon, California, with a sweeping view of San Francisco Bay. They devote as much time to their home as The Kingston Trio's busy schedule allows. But since May 4th, 196, their outside activities have become sublimated to a new member of the family -- their daughter, Joan Glancy, nicknamed Jody. According to Bob, "She's the one with the best vocal cords in the family," And according to Mrs. Shane, the child inherited Bob's amiable disposition.

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